Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2019, Page: 88-96
Solvent Decomposition of Polyurethane Foam Obtained from Waste Upholstered Furniture to Recover Polyols
Yanfang Pang, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Xiaosheng Liu, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Yan Li, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Tongtong Cui, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Xin Liu, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Qi Li, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Hui Wan, College of Material and Engineering, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming, China
An Mao, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Wood Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China
Received: Jul. 11, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 4, 2019;       Published: Aug. 15, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajpst.20190503.13      View  113      Downloads  34
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of recovering the polyols from the polyurethane (PU) foam obtained from waste upholstered furniture (sofa) by chemical decomposition using the propylene glycol (PPG) as the decomposing solvent and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as the catalyst, respectively. The effects of temperature (180°C and 200°C), reaction time (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3 hours), and PPG/PU weight ratio (2:1, 3:1, and 4:1) on the decomposition reaction and the physicochemical properties of the recovered polyols, such as hydroxyl number, viscosity, and amine number were investigated. Higher temperature and PPG/PU weight ratio promoted the PU decomposition reaction and resulted in lower viscosity, higher hydroxyl number, and higher amine number of the recovered polyols. The hydroxyl number and amine number increased as the reaction progressed, while the viscosity decreased. Once the reaction was completed, little change was observed for the hydroxyl number and viscosity of the recovered polyols. The recovered polyol obtained at 200°Cand PPG/PU weight ratio of 3:1 showed about the same length of time for the reaction, as well as the physical properties to that obtained at 180°C and PPG/PU weight ratio of 4:1. These recovered polyols had similar hydroxyl number and viscosity to those of commercial polyol used for PU coatings, elastomers, adhesives, and sealants.
Keywords
Polyol, Polyurethane Foam, Upholstered Furniture, Decomposition, Recover
To cite this article
Yanfang Pang, Xiaosheng Liu, Yan Li, Tongtong Cui, Xin Liu, Qi Li, Hui Wan, An Mao, Solvent Decomposition of Polyurethane Foam Obtained from Waste Upholstered Furniture to Recover Polyols, American Journal of Polymer Science and Technology. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2019, pp. 88-96. doi: 10.11648/j.ajpst.20190503.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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